Position Announcement: Tech Crew Member- Summer Youth Conservation Corps.

Published February 14th, 2017 in Blog, What's Happening? | Comments Off on Position Announcement: Tech Crew Member- Summer Youth Conservation Corps.

Job Summary:

Are you looking for a summer job that will give you the chance to spend a summer outdoors in beautiful mountain scenery, learn new skills in natural resources, building your resume and give back to your community?  The North Fork John Day Watershed Council is hiring people ages 18 and up to staff our Technical Summer Conservation Crews.  Crew members will work 4, 10-hour days per week under the supervision of a crew leader.  Work will include natural resource projects such as: wilderness trail maintenance, trail and campground surveys, fence removal, habitat development, construction and data collection.  Crews will often camp on or near weekly work sites. The period of employment for this crew is season long, approximately early June through the end of summer.

 

Essential Functions:

  • Work outdoors under direction of an experienced crew leader
  • Projects may include maintenance and restoration of trails, wilderness trail, field surveys, fence removal, recreation facility development, and construction
  • Projects may involve hiking several miles a day, using chainsaws, cross-cut saws and hand tools (training provided)

 

Job Requirements:

  • Prior work experience is NOT required although experience with saws and hand tools will be useful
  • All crew members must be 18 years of age or older
  • Willingness and ability to camp overnight on a regular basis
  • Commitment to working the whole season
  • Must be legally eligible to work in the United States

 

The North Fork John Day Watershed Council is looking for people who…

  • Have a great work ethic
  • Love hiking and spending time outdoors in all kinds of weather
  • Are interested in learning more about natural resources

 

To apply pick up an application from the NFJDWC office (691 HWY 395N, Long Creek, OR  97856), Prairie City, Grant Union, Long Creek, Monument, Dayville or Ukiah High Schools or download here. Return the completed application to the North Fork John Day Watershed Council by 4pm April 7 either in person, by mail (PO Box 444, Long Creek, OR 97856) or by email amye@nfjdwc.org

Position Announcement: Crew Member- Summer Youth Conservation Corps.

Published February 14th, 2017 in Blog, What's Happening? | Comments Off on Position Announcement: Crew Member- Summer Youth Conservation Corps.

Job Summary:

Are you looking for a summer job that will give you the chance to enjoy the outdoors, learn new skills in natural resources, and building your resume while giving back to your community?  The North Fork John Day Watershed Council is hiring people ages 14 and up to staff our summer conservation crews. Crew members will work full time Monday thru Friday under the supervision of a crew leader.  Crews will take on natural resource projects including wilderness trail maintenance, trail and campground surveys, fence removal and data collection. The period of employment is typically available in sessions from 2-8 weeks.

 

Essential Functions:

  • Physical work out of doors in all weather conditions, restoring and maintaining trails and implementing natural resource projects under the direction of an experienced crew leader
  • Projects may include maintenance and restoration of trails, resource and campsite surveys, fence removal, fence construction, stream structure construction, fish salvage, and other projects beneficial to the ecosystem
  • Projects may involve hiking several miles a day and other strenuous labor

 

Job Requirements:

  • Prior work experience is NOT required
  • All crew members must be 14 years of age or older
  • Must commit to working a minimum of 4 weeks
  • Must be legally eligible to work in the United States

 

The North Fork John Day Watershed Council is looking for people who…

  • Have a great work ethic
  • Love hiking and spending time outdoors in all kinds of weather
  • Are interested in learning more about natural resources

 

To apply pick up an application from the NFJDWC office (691 HWY 395N, Long Creek, OR  97856), Prairie City, Grant Union, Long Creek, Monument, Dayville or Ukiah High Schools or Download here. Return the completed application to the North Fork John Day Watershed Council by 4pm April 7 either in person, by mail (PO Box 444, Long Creek, OR 97856) or by email to amye@nfjdwc.org

Position Announcement: Crew Leader – Summer Youth Conservation Corps.

Published February 14th, 2017 in Blog, What's Happening? | Comments Off on Position Announcement: Crew Leader – Summer Youth Conservation Corps.

 

Do you love to work outdoors where fantastic mountain scenery can be a part of your daily routine?  Do you love watching teens have new experiences and learn new skills in nature?  The North Fork John Day Watershed Council (NFJDWC) is looking for motivated people 21 years of age and older who would like to make a difference for the people and the natural resources in the Upper John Day River Basin.  NFJDWC seeks crew leaders to guide and encourage 4-5 Summer Youth Conservation Crew employees (ages 14 and up) in performing diverse natural resource tasks. This position may require leading projects that involve the use of chainsaws, cross cut saws and hand tools (training provided).

 

Anticipated term: June 5, 2017 through September 8, 2017

(This time frame is flexible)

 

Job Description: Crew leaders will be responsible for guiding young adult employees, helping them to build an outdoor ethic and accomplish natural resource stewardship projects to improve ecologic health. Crew leaders will work with Council staff and also with resource professionals from the private and public sectors to manage daily projects. Primary responsibilities include: implementation of safety policies, engagement and mentoring of teens and young adults, transporting crew members to and from work sites (valid driver’s license and clean record required), project implementation, record keeping and training.

 

Duties:

  • Arrive ½ hour before crew for daily planning
  • Lead youth in daily activities (including morning preparation such as: gathering appropriate tools, stretching, vehicle inspection)
  • Maintain safety controls at all times
  • Drive youth safely to worksite
  • Ability to focus first on youth training and also balance participating in project tasks
  • Assure youth take appropriate breaks as per State labor standards
  • Teach youth to perform tasks (communication, navigation, safe tool use)
  • Provide education on natural resource topics
  • Maintaining records and fill out daily paperwork
  • Maintain communication with Council staff multiple times daily
  • Returning safely at the end of the day, assuring tools and vehicle are prepared for the next day
  • Remain with the crew until the last employee has left for home
  • Some crews will be required to camp overnight on/near job sites

 

Location: Positions are available in the Blue Mountains of Eastern Oregon, in communities including: John Day, Prairie City, Long Creek, Ukiah.

 

Projects: Projects may include trail maintenance, removal of brush and small trees along trails, invasive plant species inventory and treatment, campground cleanup, fence removal and repair, fish salvage, and other diverse tasks. Expect all weather conditions and lots of hiking!

 

Qualifications:

  • Possess a desire to work outdoors
  • Be at least 21 years of age
  • Possess a valid state driver’s license with a clean driving record
  • Successfully complete a criminal background check
  • Complete First Aid and CPR Training (available during staff training)
  • Knowledge or experience in natural resources and/or youth development
  • Ability to perform physical labor manually for up to 10 hours in inclement weather
  • Legally able to work in the United States

 

Contact NFJDWC for wage information

 

To apply: Please email or mail a cover letter, resume and 3 references to amye@nfjdwc.org

 

NFJDWC

Amy Early

PO Box 444

Long Creek, OR  97856

(541)421-3018

Big Mosquito Riparian Enhancement

Published January 18th, 2017 in Blog, What's Happening? | Comments Off on Big Mosquito Riparian Enhancement

Multiple large landslides within the Big Creek Subwatershed created meadows that historically functioned to store large volumes of water for gradual release later in the flow period. Thus, these meadows can extend the base flows into the drier summer months. Deadwood Creek reaches 1-3 is a depositional valley formed by the largest landslide within Big Creek and along with Big Creek reach 4 composes the core depositional features used for steelhead spawning within the Subwatershed. Deadwood reaches 1-3 have grass-dominated streambanks with alder communities that are being overtopped by lodgepole pine. These low gradient reaches have been drying out due to the absence of beaver. A lack of large woody debris or persisting beaver dams has resulted in channel incision. Fire suppression has led to an overly dense stand that created poor large wood recruitment and reduced biodiversity. The confluence of several tributaries with Big Creek is characterized by a steep gradient. Large wood is needed to control the grade and initiate pools within this section of the creek.

Wet meadows are becoming increasingly important water reservoirs. Increasing ambient air temperatures are predicted to cause both temporal and spatial changes in the delivery of fresh water. Scientists anticipate increased winter runoff from water melting earlier in the season and falling as rain rather than snow. This will cause earlier peak streamflows in the spring and diminshed runoff during the hot summer months. The outcome of these changes will be significantly altered flow regimes. Anadromous fish runs are adapted to typical flow conditions. The predicted changes in snowpack means that the John Day Basin will have to rely more heavily on other forms of natural water storage. Wet meadows collect and store runoff, which not only helps prevent seasonal flooding, but also ensures the availability of water throughout the dry summer months.

Unfortunately, the hydrologic function of several meadows within the Big Creek-Middle Fork John Day Watershed has been impaired by the presence of gullies and incised channels which transport water off the meadow. The result is a dry, dusty meadow with a decreased water table and reduced riparian vegetative biomass and biodiversity.

For this project, the Malheur National Forest chose to use the natural resources available rather than bring in man-made materials. Large Woody Debris (LWD) was placed in the streams to concentrate scour, store sediment, and promote the creation and maintenance of quality pools. The LWD placement consisted of 80-100 large trees (diameter at least 12 inches) per mile and 438 small trees (diameter between 4-12 inches) per mile. Twenty percent of the large trees were greater than 20 inches in diameter, at least 35 ft long, or 1.5 times the bank-full width of the stream.

This project pioneered a new strategy for wet meadow restoration. Healthy wet meadows act as nature’s sponges by soaking up available water, storing it, and slowly releasing it during the dry season. However, the meadows in this project had been drained by gullies and incised channels which conveyed the water off the meadow much faster. For this project, trees and brush were cut and placed in the incised channels to decrease the flow of water running off the meadows. The North Fork John Day Watershed Council provided five youth crews to perform the task of installing the woody material into gullies of each of the six identified meadows.In one meadow, the benefit of the work was visible within only a few days. As the meadow began to rehydrate, the wet area increased in distance from the filled channel.  

Funding for this project was provided by the Malheur National Forest and The Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

2016 Summer Youth Program

Published January 13th, 2017 in Blog, What's Happening? | Comments Off on 2016 Summer Youth Program

Each year the North Fork John Day Watershed Council Summer Youth Program grows and improves!  The summer of 2016 marks a milestone for participation and accomplishments.  This is best illustrated in knowing that partners expected this summer’s crews to complete 7 miles of recreational trail rehabilitation.  With great crew leaders and determined, hard-working youth, they completed 112 miles!  Our Grant County kids rock!

Projects this summer were diverse and included a lot of cleanup work to rehabilitate resources burned in the 2015 fires.  In addition, some of the crews built brand new fencing on the Malheur National Forest to keep domestic livestock out of sensitive aspen stands.  Others repaired older woven wire fences that exclude browsing on sensitive species.  The crews eradicated weeds from several sites and maintained recreational trails.  Streambanks near threatened bull trout habitat were treated.  Old fences were removed from the landscape to prevent life-threatening tangling situations for wildlife.  Students also were engaged in data collection for research using state-of-the-art acoustic monitoring equipment to track birds and bats.  They also collected monitoring data on invasive weeds.  Additional projects included installation of bird houses and public presentations at the County fair.  Two crews spent the entire summer dedicated to major meadow restoration where they worked tirelessly to restore the meadow floodplain.  Some crews re-lined a washed-out culvert and performed forest thinning operations.  One crew even had a chance to re-habilitate a remote emergency heliport pad.  Every crew had an opportunity to participate in a fish salvage operation prior to in-stream restoration construction.  Each year, this is a favorite activity of all crew members.

In the summer of 2016, the North Fork John Day Watershed Council added a special program for older and experienced crew participants.  The Council established 2 new crews that were provided with technical skills training.  The participants in these crews received USFS chainsaw training and each person became a certified sawyer. Each also received first aid training and certification allowing them to move on to be crew leaders in future years.  These crews were invaluable in serving our partners with high-level services.  The technical crews hiked weekly into the site of the 2015 Canyon Creek Fire Complex where they helped fell hazard trees and removed debris along recreation trails that had been impacted by the fire.  Crews were also dispatched to restore habitat and maintain public land at the Big Mosquito project at the north end of Grant County.  There they place woody material into several miles of incised stream channels.

Overall, 12 crews employing 60 youth and six crew leaders have contributed to the ecosystem health of the Blue Mountains.   Each youth is paid hourly wages for their labors, learns new skills, and gets job training.  WE ARE EXTREMELY PROUD OF OUR YOUNG EMPLOYEES!

In 2016, we had a very special opportunity for rural kids.  The KEEN CORPORATION donated work boots to all of our 4-week crew participants!

 

The Watershed Council is deeply grateful to all the people and organizations that help fund this program and create extraordinary opportunities for Grant County youth while, at the same time, improving our lovely, local landscape!  Funders and contributors who help make this program possible include:

 

 

 

 

Bill Healy Foundation

City of Long Creek

Desolation Creek, LLC

Diack Science Foundation

East Cascades Audubon

Ecotrust Forest Management

Grant County

Gray Family Foundation

Keen Corporation

National Fish & Wildlife Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

Oregon Youth Conservation Corps

Ritter Hot Springs

Title II program

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service

Many caring and dedicated individuals in Grant County!

North Fork John Day Summer Youth Crew 2015

Published August 5th, 2015 in Blog, What's Happening? | Comments Off on North Fork John Day Summer Youth Crew 2015

The crew has built brand new fencing on the Malheur National Forest to keep domestic livestock out of sensitive stream areas – known as riparian areas.  On the Malheur Forest, the crews have also eradicated weeds from several sites, maintained recreational trails, and protected bull trout habitat. 

Crews have also been dispatched to restore habitat and m aintain recreation facilities at the Desolation Creek property at the north end of Grant County.  There they removed old fencing, added woody material to a small creek, cleaned up campgrounds, pulled weeds, and brushed fence lines.  

Old fencing was removed by two crews in the Fox Valley to prepare for new fencing being established by contractors to protect the stream environment from grazing.  

Overall, 9 crews employing 36 youth and four crew leaders have contributed to the ecosystem here in the Blue Mountains.   Each young person is paid for their labors, learns new skills, and gets job training.  WE ARE EXTREMELY PROUD OF OUR YOUNG EMPLOYEES! 

 

 

 

IMG_8831Setting wood to enhance creek channel

IMG_8820Collecting silt to “aggrade” the stream bed

IMG_8844The film crew shoots footage of the crew

The Watershed Council is deeply grateful to all the people and organizations that help us to fund this program and create opportunities for Grant County Youth while, at the same time, improving our local landscape!  Funderswho help make this program possible include:

U.S. Department of Agriculture

Oregon Community Foundation

National Fish & Wildlife Foundation

Gray Family Foundation

Ecotrust Forest Management

Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

Oregon Youth Conservation Corps

Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife

 

 

 

First Youth Crew Completes a Successful Season!

Published September 7th, 2012 in What's Happening? | Comments Off on First Youth Crew Completes a Successful Season!

The North Fork John Day Watershed Council believes that our youth hold the future of our natural resource future. We know that they need to be exposed to those resources and to develop a connection with them now. So, we put together a pilot teen work crew. It was a great success. Nine young people had the opportunity to earn a wage at the same time they were contributing to the health of landscapes in their own back yard. The crews worked on the Umatilla National Forest to evaluate and clean a young plantation and they brushed-out the Long Creek back-up watershed.

Many miles of wilderness trails were inventoried by the youth and they helped out with two fish salvages. We thank the Oregon Youth Conservation Corps., the Umatilla National Forest, the City of Long Creek, and the National Forest Foundation for making this project possible and for believing in the youth of Long Creek and Monument.


Copyright © 2017 North Fork John Day Watershed Council